Surviving Godzilla

Join me on this roller-coaster ride I call my life as I try to find my own niche in the world.
centuriespast:

Madame Bigottini (1785–1858), as a Bacchante
by Jacques Antoine Vallin
Date painted: 1817
Oil on canvas, 56.2 x 46.3 cm
Collection: The Bowes Museum
The artist depicts the great pre-Romantic ballerina, Emilie Bigottini, assuming the role of a Bacchante with grapes in her hair and a leopard skin loosely draped over the shoulders. 

centuriespast:

Madame Bigottini (1785–1858), as a Bacchante

by Jacques Antoine Vallin

Date painted: 1817

Oil on canvas, 56.2 x 46.3 cm

Collection: The Bowes Museum

The artist depicts the great pre-Romantic ballerina, Emilie Bigottini, assuming the role of a Bacchante with grapes in her hair and a leopard skin loosely draped over the shoulders. 

leahcultice:

Fia Ljungstrom by Alan Gelati for Harper’s Bazaar Russia June 2014

leahcultice:

Fia Ljungstrom by Alan Gelati for Harper’s Bazaar Russia June 2014

instagram:

The Whimsically Macabre Scenes of @__remmidemmi

To see more of Sandro’s explorations of “bodies with no regret,” follow @__remmidemmi on Instagram.

In his macabre, tragicomic photo series, Italian photographer Sandro Giordoan (@__remmidemmi) explores the willingness of people to put the safety of material objects before their own well-being.

When conceiving the project, _IN EXTREMIS (bodies with no regret), Sandro drew from personal experience. “Last summer I had a small but tough bicycle accident,” he explains. “I lost 30% of my right hand’s functions because I never let go of the object I was holding as I fell.”

When, shortly after, a friend broke his leg to prevent his smartphone from falling in water, Sandro became concerned. “We live in a time where we risk material things becoming more important than our own lives, and this is really worrying.”

Sandro channeled his concern into crafting meticulous and whimsical photos. “I immediately felt the urgency to capture the moment of impact. I wanted to talk about obsessions, neurosis and frailties of our times through my personal experience.” The resulting photos are at once humorous and haunting.

Many think that the wildly contorted bodies in Sandro’s photos are dolls or dummies. Not so, says Sandro. “I work exclusively with professional actors who are able to position themselves in anatomically impossible poses because they are trained to use their bodies to communicate.”

geoffsayshi:

12 Angry Men: Trivia

Taking me back to the time when I was obsessed with Sidney Lumet’s techniques.

(Source: avengetheangels)